Energy Market Updates

Posts about:

china

Diesel Futures Rise, but Overall Trend Suggests Cooling

Diesel Futures have risen just over $.25 in the last week, for largely the same reason as they tanked the week before.  China is now lifting most Covid restrictions, as traders now see demand picking up on the world basket.  Even though we are still seeing huge weekly swings, the overall temperature of Distillates looks to be cooling off since trading some $.75 higher than presently mid summer (see below). 

Domestically, this week saw distillate demand still strong, which surprised some.  Still might be some residual power plant use feeding those demand numbers. With Crude showing a huge increase in stocks this week, gaining 19 mmbls, one would have guessed it would have set the whole market downward.  We mentioned that cold snaps, storms, and a pipeline reopening might need a week or two to shake out the inventories and traders took that to heart.  Signs of moderating inflation figures have some thinking the doom and gloom of a full blown, long term recession, might be over done and we are in for a “soft landing” or a purposeful slowing down of the economy. 

Futures are currently on the upswing of the curve, but again, the pattern suggests a sharp pull back.  The backwardation in diesel futures is still hanging around, actually widening in the last several sessions, making some suppliers keep a watchful eye on inventories.  As we work into the heart of the winter, don’t be surprised if outages of distillates pop up.  Again, a strong relationship with your supplier will keep your business running. 

jan 23 ulsd

 

Read More

Volatility Continues in ULSD Market

Extreme volatility continues grip the futures markets as the USLD pit erased almost $.30 in the last two days.  Even though its up about $.05 currently, expect this sell off to continue for the short term. 

Much of the market has hinged on the anticipated rebound in global demand, largely centered around China.  After being basically cut off from the rest of the world for the last two years, signs were pointing to Covid restrictions and cases easing.  Those hopes took a gut punch Tuesday as reports surfaced that a surge in Covid cases has caused the country to basically halt their rollback of restrictions. 

Fundamentally, the market appears to be better supplied, which is also putting downward pressure on futures.   Physical markets are still seeing wide ranges in price action from one day to the next and some local outages are still popping up. The good news is that last weeks cold snap that pushed freezing temps into the heart of production country left little to no damage to refiners - lessons learned from the hard freeze a few years back. 

Demand spiked briefly last week as many power plants were forced to burn oil for a few days.  It will be interesting to see what inventories look like (which are due today, delayed a day for the holiday).  Keystone is operational, but will not be 100% for another few weeks so there will likely be some shaking out period with the numbers. 

Overall, it looks like we are starting another pull back which hopefully puts front month ULSD futures in the $2.70 range.

1.5.23 ULSD

 

Read More

Fundamentals Continue to Push Futures Around

If you were to read the news, it is almost impossible to tell which way the Oil markets are going as the volatility has all pits in wild daily swings.  Fortunately for most of us, diesel prices have corrected over $.30 in the last three days and all but erased the early August climb. 

Demand, Economy, and Inventory are the fundamentals that continue to push futures around.  Reports from the IEA on worldwide demand “coming to a halt” in the fourth quarter due to slowing global economies and continued lockdowns in China rippled through the market yesterday along with interesting Inventory news.  Demand right now sits at its lowest point since JAN21.   

Shown below, gas stocks fell to a 10 month low, but was taken lightly as it is typical this time of year as we switch seasonal grades.  The bearish news came with Distillates building for a third week in a row, albeit still 12% off from a year ago.  Unfortunately for us in the Northeast, our stocks fell by 3%.   Exports of distillates finally fell last week but again they are a staggering 83% higher than last year. With the FED poised to make another 75 basis point rate hike, most anticipate the collateral damage to be demand.  Thus fueling sell off. 

This summers price action is truly one for the record books.  Since May, ULSD has gone up $1, down $1, Up $1 and down $1.  Remember the days that if the market moved $.01 you had  a meeting to figure out what to do?   

Having a good relationship with your supplier is critical during these times.  While it is impossible to predict what the pits will do, its always best to at least know what is happening.

 

Read More

Volatility Continues with Economic Concerns, Export Increases

In the last 6 sessions we have seen ULSD futures slide just over $.50 in value.  While this is good news, the previous 6 sessions added just about the same amount. So basically we are back to the same levels we were mid-August where we all felt pretty positive pricing was moving in the right direction. Much of the rise can be attributed to money being put into the market as an inflation hedge as rates continue to rise, though it is tough to keep that money in long term with the ever present backwardation. 

The slide the last week has come as demand concerns continue to make headlines and more currently China is again locking down several major cities with COVID concerns.  Yesterdays inventory report seemed Bullish on the surface with draws on all products but like anything, the devil is in the details.  Many saw the latest news cycle highlighting the possibility of fuel shortages coming this winter.  A good explanation shows in this weeks report.  Refiners are operating at pre-Pandemic levels, yet domestic inventories of finished products are still down- the key factor is that our exports of gas and distillates are up over 500m b/d over last year. 

Again, it is still better for companies to ship products overseas to get 5x the value than if it were to sell into the US markets.  Forcing US producers to sell into US markets versus formerly heavily Russian supplied countries may appear as abandonment in their time of need politically speaking, and moreover, will that force those countries to “amend” Russian import sanctions……thus it’s a delicate balance.  

The field seems to be mixed on the last few months of the year in where pricing will be headed although the common theme is that the volatility, up or down, is here for a while.

Sept 1 ULSD

 

Read More

Wild Intraday Swings on ULSD

The last three sessions have seen .4373 get peeled off the ULSD front month contract, with massive intraday swings.  Yesterday at the open, APR22 ULSD fell almost .25 before rallying back to finish down only .0673. 

The big drop on Monday was attributed to China locking down Shanghai amid new outbreaks for a minimum of four days thus putting demand fears into the market.  Tuesday saw traders take into account that there appeared to be progress in peace talks amongst Ukrainian and Russian delegates, but that subsided as the day went on.  This morning that sentiment furthered as it appeared there was nothing to report on the situation other than both sides would agree to meet again.  It is clear that many sanctions that have been put in place, may have a longer stay even if there is a withdrawal.

Pricing is wild right now, cash markets are making it even more challenging. 

The Chart below doesn’t do much other than confirm Warren Buffett’s take “that if you flip it over, it says the same thing.” 

With Demand appearing to take a hit in this week’s DOE report, and subsequently Inventory rising, products have come off there morning highs by about .15 and are only up about .04 at present.  On a positive note, most OPEC nations have come out and stated the they would not let Politics get in the way of production levels, which may calm supply fears, evident in the .32 backwardation APR to MAY.

ULSD 3.30.22

 

Read More

Demand Concerns Temper Prices Despite Supply Crunch

shutterstock_187711847

Oil prices are continuing to slide back down some after multiyear highs last week. (At time of writing at 10 this morning, both refined products are trending down)

All of the issues with energy supply and labor shortages are still in play (obviously) so what’s going on?

The other side of the coin – demand, is once again raising concerns and tempering some of the bullishness on the markets.

The US reported lower industrial output for September, which is dampening enthusiasm over economic rebound and rising demand in the industrial sector. A large factor in play in the lower U.S. numbers is the continuing (worsening?) global semiconductor shortage. The lack of availability is severely hampering production and availability of motor vehicles and slowing progress on large scale tech projects.

Additionally, China’s data did not do much to allay demand fears, third quarter economic growth hit a low for the year, as did daily Crude processing levels. China’s lackluster reports are largely due to supply bottlenecks and shortages like the US data is.

As mentioned however, seasonal supply concerns for the upcoming winter, labor shortages (particularly in the trucking industry), generally positive economic rebound, OPEC cuts, and an uncertain trajectory for COVID-19 cases as we enter the flu season are still all factors very much in play in the markets, all of which we would normally expect to push prices higher.

So the ongoing question becomes which way the pendulum will swing between the supply issues and the demand requirements. Supply (at the moment) is what it is, the major variable is whether demand moves up and forces supply crunch related price hikes, or if the labor situation and slowing economic growth drop the demand enough overall to drop prices in the longer term.

All that being said – make hay while the sun shines as they say. Not a bad time to lock a prompt in case tomorrow flips the screens positive again.

Stay Tuned!

Read More

High Outputs, High Case Numbers, and Low Economic Growth Crush Refined Product Prices

shutterstock_1668463777

Weak economic data from the United States & China, combined with higher OPEC outputs and rising COVID cases have again raised concerns about oversupply and weakening demand and pushed markets into sell off territory.

Today saw Crude drop 4% to 71.26/bbl, and refined products followed suit, with front month trading closing down .0598 on ULSD to 2.1358 and down an even .06 on RBOB to 2.2747. 

So what's going on?

China reported its slowest factory activity growth in almost a year and a half, which has raised concerns about the strength of the global recovery, particularly as China, in addition to having the world's second largest economy, has had the most robust recovery of the Asian region thus far. In the US, manufacturing activity slowed for the second month as well - so we are two for two on the world's largest economies showing signs of weakness and slowing recovery. 

Globally, we are also seeing an increase in the number of COVID cases reported as a result of the delta variant. Despite reassurances from Fauci and the government at large that the United States will not be looking at a second round of lockdowns because vaccination rates should be sufficient to avoid them,  the resurgence of mask mandates and other protocols in some areas has led to some skepticism that economic recovery and therefore demand growth will continue. 

At the same time these concerns mount on the demand side, on the supply side, the output from OPEC+ countries for July hit its highest level since the beginning of the Pandemic (April 2020).  The OPEC+ member nations had begun a reversal on previously agreed to output cuts largely based on oil price recovery and a sunny outlook on demand.

It's possible, but unlikely, that the strategy will be reversed again even as we see the demand outlook be flipped on its head. 

So once again, the standing headline conclusion is "we have to wait and see" on both how COVID shakes out, and what OPEC+ may do. 2020 Deja Vu all over again!

Stay Tuned! 

Read More

EIA Draws Slow COVID Resurgence Induced Sell Offs

shutterstock_1707677488EIA Inventory report showed much larger draws across the board on all products than anticipated. By the official count, Crude drew down 4.1mmb (2.9 expected), distillates 3.1mmb (435K expected) and gasoline 2.25mmb (916K expected). 

  The draws indicate a continuing tightness on the supply side in     the face of massive demand recovery as economies by and large get back to work as "normal". However, the past few weeks we've seen drops consistently on heightening concern about COVID resurgence and the spread of the Delta variant. 

Concern lingers as countries report a rise in cases and some have reintroduced some lockdown measures, or revised guidelines (including new guidance by the CDC on masks in the US). The growing fear is that extension of lockdown measures, or a return to lockdowns in a given sector could once again plummet demand and send markets reeling.  . 

On the other hand, global market supply is still extremely tight, even with additional produced gallons by OPEC+ member countries coming online. 

So, we essentially are in a weird spot where demand alone is the critical piece of whether the market will rally or slide - global supply is low which would support price increases, but if China does in fact crack down on imports of Crude as they appear to be doing, and COVID continues to tick up globally again the demand drop could be such that we don't see a rally materialize.

It's really anyone's guess as to how the world responds to continuing COVID fears should the cases continue to rise. 

Stay Tuned!  

 

Read More

Markets Up on OPEC+ Hope and Coronavirus Slowdown

markets_pic

WTI Crude traded & settled below $50/bbl earlier this week, as prices continued to slide across commodities. Today, however, we saw the trend reversing, with the market up this morning by almost 3%. (Early on, we were up over the 3% mark but gains dropped off slightly after the EIA inventory reports were released this morning.) 

EIA Inventories showed builds on Crude of 7.5mmb, well above analyst expectations. Gasoline drew down 100K bbl, and distillate stocks dropped 2mmb, as well. Distillate numbers were essentially in line with expectations. Crude pared about .5% on the builds, and gasoline moderated but stayed up, as analysts were predicting builds of ~700K barrels versus the actual drop of 100K barrels reported. 

In broader news, most of today's increases are being pegged on confidence that the OPEC+ production cuts supposedly forthcoming will both be in effect quickly, and will see full member adherence to new lower limits.

Also, China is reporting the lowest number of new Coronavirus cases since January, which is continuing to restore confidence in their economy and calming fears regarding a longer term global slow down on oil demand growth.

At the close, Crude settled back up over $50 again at $51.17/bbl (Tuesday's close was $49.94), ULSD closed up .0490 to $1.6757 and RBOB closed up .0668 to $1.5810.

Stay tuned!

 

Read More

US-China Trade Deal Keeps Markets Range Bound

china-US trade deal

Prices have been somewhat up and down, but largely range bound over the past several days of trading.

It's not because there's nothing going on but because there is a lot happening but it's sort of up in the air which way everything will go. 

The ongoing US/China trade tension situation is both the major factor and a good example - "Phase One" of a trade agreement is in the books as of Wednesday, including a pledge by China to buy "at least 52.4 billion of US Energy products over the next two years" (although what that entails specifically was not clarified)... That sounds like news that should be pushing oil up substantially -  but we don't actually know if any trade deal will change demand forecasts, so it may be that pricing is largely unaffected. 

Some of the confusion is that this is "just phase 1" and the US has announced that they are not removing tariffs on billions of dollars of Chinese goods until phase 2 (whatever that is) is agreed to, but we have revised tariffs down substantially on 120 billion OTHER Chinese goods previously at a higher rate.

Essentially, no one is really sure what we can expect to see in terms of real impacts from Phase 1 -or how long Phase 2 will take. 

(You can read the details of Phase 1 in this article on MarketWatch: "Trump signs landmark China deal and says removal of tariffs would come in next phase"). 

Yesterday (Wednesday) The EIA inventory report for the week ending January 10 showed surprisingly huge builds on distillates and gasoline, 6.7mmb and 8.2mmb, respectively. (Analysts had predicted 3.3 on gas and 1.3 on distillates). Crude also surprised traders with a 2.5mmb decline (against a 1.1mmb speculated build). Wednesday's close reflected the report with a drop of .0324 ($1.8779) on ULSD, a drop of .0176 on gas ($1.6368) and a final number of $57.81/bbl on WTI Crude. 

Today we have been mixed most of the day as the trade deal news gets analyzed and digested, primarily. At the close, ULSD was down .0179 to $1.8600, RBOB gained .0180 to $1.6548 and Crude settled at $58.52, from $57.81 Wednesday.  

This week the EIA also revised its expectation for WTI & Brent crude for 2020, putting WTI at an average of $59.25, pretty close to where we have been trending the past week or so (1/8-1/16: 58.08-59.61/bbl)

Stay tuned! 

 

Read More

Subscribe to Email Updates