Election Day Free Fall for WTI, Stocks

Posted by Kelly Burke on Nov 4, 2014 11:31:54 AM

Line charts depicting the stock market scattered on a table

Everything is dropping across the board today - WTI is maintaining itself under the $80 benchmark (currently -1.76 at 78.78/bbl), Gas and ULSD are both down over 5 this morning on the NYMEX and the Dow and Nasdaq are both following suit into the red. 

So whats going on?

The reason the dropoff has escalated today in particular is likely due to the Saudi announcement that they will discount Crude imported to the US, which has really ramped up the economic pressure on fracking companies.

It appears the Saudi price pressures are starting to take effect on American production, with Chevron and Shell both announcing scale backs in popular shale plays and exploration proposals.

The estimated cost per barrel extraction in the US is around $60, which is about double the production cost for the Saudis. So when WTI is getting toward the mid 70's/bbl the profitability starts to drop off, and quickly. 

Additionally, the trade deficit is at a 4 year high, as global growth remains at a crawl, further dropping demand and therefore prices in the face of ever increasing supply. Slow global growth demand plus a strong dollar put a damper on exports. Additionally, construction spending fell in September, so the economic outlook for Q4 aint looking so good, and seems to be bringing the bears out across the board.

Stay tuned!

 

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Topics: Fracking, OPEC, WTI Crude, stock market

Goldman Sachs Cuts Price Forecast for Oil: Projects $75/bbl Benchmark

Posted by Kelly Burke on Oct 27, 2014 4:38:05 PM

Line charts depicting the stock market scattered on a table

Goldman Sachs has revised its projected oil prices for 2015 to $75/bbl for WTI and $85/bbl for Brent Crude, in response to ramped up supplies and slow projected global economic growth. 

Production from the US, Brazil, and the Gulf is projected to increase almost 1 million bpd, combined, and OPEC production is assumed to remain more or less stable - with gains in Iraqi production and drops in Libyan output essentially cancelling one another out. 

Like wev'e talked about, OPEC may curb production to offset the decline at some point, and analysts seem to think 75 may be the price point at which US shale production slows and spurs OPEC to drop production. Its unlikely they will make major moves until US production shows signs of slowing against low margins, or thats the prevailing theory, anyway. 

Oil was down today on that and other ho-hum economic news, and stocks fell in tandem. Europe settled 2.2 billion in bond purchases today in a preventative move against deflation, and the re-election of Brazilian President Rouseff reversed the hope some had that the country would move in a more positive, business-friendly direction. 

On the NYMEX, ULSD closed off -.0066 and gas settled out at 2.11702, down -.0115 for the day. 

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Topics: Goldman Sachs, Brent Crude, OPEC, WTI Crude, stock market, shale

OPEC Chatter Drives up BRENT, Friday Trading Reverses CRUDE Rally

Posted by Kelly Burke on Oct 24, 2014 1:52:54 PM

Line charts depicting the stock market scattered on a table

Thursday saw prices tick up after it was reported that the Saudi's output dropped from 9.69 million barrels to 9.36 million barrels. There has been some chatter and concern around the scheduled OPEC meeting in November. The concern being that OPEC will push curbing supply to stop the price declines we've seen in recent months. Brent Crude was up 3% on the news, the highest its been in 4 months.

However, despite the OPEC chatter, the Saudi's have said they will keep output at scheduled high levels even with lower pricing to maintain market share. Additionally, reportedly only a small number of members have suggested supply curbing.

US Inventories surged on this weeks EIA report as well, up 7.1 million barrels to a little over 377 million barrels, which was about twice what analysts predicted, and hopefully helps to calm some of the potentially unfounded fear of OPEC that's pushing volatility. 

If we look back, the 20% drop in crude pricing we've seen over the past several months have been directly related to an abundance of supply, and with US oil production surging ahead, and the Saudi's not indicating they will initiate any sort of hold back to drive prices up, the situation remains the same and the volatility should back off. However, it's possible that some roller coastering will remain until after the meeting, when its officially settled whether or not we have to worry about supply curbing. 

The market seems to concur today, though, with both Brent and WTI trending back downwards.

ULSD & RBOB are trending down on the NYMEX today as well, down about a penny and a half on both at the moment. Both products closed up significantly yesterday - ULSD +.0256 to 2.499 and gas up +.0513 to 2.2069, which effectively cancelled out Wednesdays drops of .0398 and .0578, for those keeping score at home.

 

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Topics: Brent Crude, CRUDE, RBOB, OPEC, WTI Crude, EIA Inventories, ulsd

Retail & Market Prices Drop on Crude Supply & Pricing

Posted by Kelly Burke on Oct 8, 2014 1:44:23 PM

Fuel pump filling up a commuter car

EIA weekly petroleum report showed inventory gains across the board.

Analysts had expected much smaller builds in CRUDE than the actuals, and had anticipated drops in both gasoline and distillate inventories - neither of which came to fruition. (Who are these "analysts" anyways - not even CLOSE, guys!)

  • CRUDE: inventories jumped 5 million barrels. (Expectation was a build of 1.9 million barrels)
  • Gasoline: inventories jumped 1.2 million barrels, while the EIA showed a drop in consumption of 1.3%. (Analysts had anticipated a 900K barrel drop)
  • Distillates: inventories were up 400K barrels. Both production and consumption levels dropped for distillates. (Analysts had antipated a 1.2 million barrel drop) 

Retail gasoline prices in the US have been trending downward big time, spurred on by the drop in CRUDE prices, as well as weakening demand. The reported average for last week was 3.41/gal in September which is almost 30 cents below the average price 4 months ago. AAA is reporting that the current average gasoline price is $3.267 - a little over 8 cents a gallon cheaper than this time last year. 

Lower global demand, high supply, and a bleak global economic outlook (we're looking at you Europe) dropped Brent Crude to lows we havent seen in years - September was the first time Brent traded under $100/bbl in 2 years, and last week saw Brent hit $92, close to a 27 month low.

WTI is trading down as well, having broken through several resistance levels, and hit $86.20 after the EIA report hit this morning. (At the moment its -1.53 to 87.32 on the electronics)   

The NYMEX is trending down today again, currently ULSD is down over 3 cents (-.0326 to 2.5747) and RBOB is down over 4. (-.0466 to 2.3217)

Stay Tuned!

 

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Topics: European Economy, Brent Crude, Gasoline demand drop, CRUDE, WTI Crude, EIA Inventories, retail gasoline

Commodities, Stocks and Consumer Confidence Drop

Posted by Kelly Burke on Sep 30, 2014 4:16:50 PM

Line charts depicting the stock market scattered on a table

November traded down huge today on the NYMEX with ULSD closing down -.0577 to 2.6505, and RBOB closing down -.0769 to 2.4373. October trading ended today, with the month closing ULSD at 2.6472 and RBOB at 2.5869. 

Analysts are predicting a supply build ahead of the EIA data due out tommorow in the neighborhood of 1.5 million barrels on CRUDE. Like we mentioned last week, the stable to increasing supply levels domestically have been a huge factor in keeping prices less volatile globally, in spite of the global insanity happening right now, especially surrounding the air strikes against ISIS.

US Supply is growing, and concerns over Libya's production are waning since they've been hitting production targets, so supply disruption in Iraq becomes an increasingly less catastrophic possibility. US import declines too serve to "free up" global supply for others, which let's everyone relax a little on potential disruptions. 

Brent and WTI are both poised to hit their biggest quarterly declines in 2 years.

The dollar strengthened for the quarter, surging up 7% - the biggest gain for a single quarter since 2008. As we've seen historically, a strong dollar can soften commodity prices, and thats probably another factor in the pullback we've seen. The dollar also impacted stocks this week, causing them to stumble hard Monday, despite increases in consumer spending reported. The concern is that the Fed is winding down its tapering and may hike interest rates in the near future if the economy is advancing and the dollar strengthening - this kind of speculation on the Fed almost always has a ripple of sell offs surrounding it, like we saw earlier this year. 

Stocks went lower today on the backs of energy stocks pushed lower on the dropping prices, and dissapointing consumer confidence index numbers. 

 

 

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Topics: Brent Crude, FED rates, Dollar Strengthens, WTI Crude, EIA Inventories, ISIS, stock market

Inventory Shocker Reverses the RBOB Slide

Posted by Kelly Burke on Aug 6, 2014 5:13:22 PM

Line charts depicting the stock market scattered on a table

A continuing poor outlook on gasoline demand and (presumably) increasing stockpiles continued to push RBOB futures down this week -  that is until it took an abrupt about face today on a shocker of an inventory report. Analysts were predicting a build of around 300,000 barrels but - surprise! - the report showed a draw of over 4 MILLION! 

ULSD settled up as well  - analysts had predicted a 900,000 barrel build and instead we saw a 1.8 million barrel drop. 

If you were stuck to the screen today, we saw NYMEX react to the panic, with gas going up over 5 cents and ULSD up over 3 breifly, before both backed down some. At the close, gas settled up .0242 to 2.7397, and ULSD closed out up .0292 to 2.8761. 

Prior to today prices were looking to go the right way - Monday saw CRUDE futures hit a 6 month low. The month of July saw WTI fall by over 6%, which is the biggest drop we have seen in more than 2 years. Prices had hit a high of 104.59 on fears over Russian supply (export) disruption after the MH17 flight crashed in Ukraine, but have backed off since those fears haven’t come to fruition. 

Earlier this week additional seemingly positive economic indicators also pushed the dollar up, which often causes a drawback in commodity pricing - which we saw happening until today's inventory numbers were released. 

Reports indicated strong growth in the manufacturing  and service sectors, with the Commerce Department pegging manufactured goods orders and durable goods orders both up over 1%.  All of these are good signs (in theory at least) that the economy is continuing to strengthen, particularly given that the positive numbers surpassed projected expectations.  

Hopefully given the generally positive economic data for the week, traders adjust to the inventory shock quickly and we'll see a correction over the next few days. 

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Topics: RBOB, Inventory Draws, WTI Crude, EIA Inventories, economic data

Stocks Slide, Energy Rebounds, and MH17 Fallout Intensifies International Standoffs

Posted by Kelly Burke on Jul 25, 2014 3:31:26 PM

Line charts depicting the stock market scattered on a table

Continuing fallout over the downed Malaysian jetliner led to increased international tensions today (deja vu?). Russia called US accusations that it supplied the anti aircraft missles responsible "groundless". President Obama insisted that Russian involvement warranted further sanctions by Western nations. And thats what we saw happen this afternoon - Canada issued new sanctions targeting financial and energy related companies (much like the US sanctions from last week) and instituted travel bans on certain individuals. 

Brent was obviously up on the news and continuing tensions that undermine stability in the markets and international relations in general. WTI was up today as well. ULSD closed up a whopping 0.0448 to 2.9157, despite distillate inventories hitting 125.9 million barrels (up 1.64 million barrels) . Gasoline took an unexpected jump as well today - after initially hanging flat to slightly down this morning and closing down 0.0233 yesterday. Inventories have been up on gas, while demand is uncharacteristically low for mid-sumer  (aka mid driving season). In fact, gasoline inventories hit a four week high - but demand hit a 6 week low, and prices still went up. Funny business. 

Additionally, its just breaking this afternoon that Israel has rejected a cease fire proposition brokered by the US, so expect ongoing turmoil there for the time being.

In the broader markets, - stocks slid basically across the board globally, with the exception of the S&P 500 and the Shanghai Index. US Treasury Yields were down and the dollar was up after dissapointing durable goods order numbers - poor numbers on durable goods indicate that there is a lack of capital expenditure still ongoing which is presumably due to a lack of confidence in the stability of the economy.

All in all another busy week with a lot of balls still in the air, and next Friday we can expect the Jobless Report, and the Fed makes a scheduled announcement on their continuing direction next Thursday,,,,, in other words the saga continues! 

Have a great weekend everyone!

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Topics: RBOB, russia, ukraine,, WTI Crude, Hamas, Israel, mh17

Iraqi Turmoil Rocks the NYMEX

Posted by Kelly Burke on Jun 12, 2014 3:57:00 PM

Map of Iraq with factions of the country highlighted

(Image credit: US EIA via Bloomberg Visual Data - Bloomberg Businessweek 6-12-14)

Both Brent and WTI shot up 2% today on last nights news that ISIS insurgents in Iraq captured Tikrit and Baiji, and were continuing their march towards Bahgdad.If you were watching the screen, you also saw ULSD shoot up .085 to 2.9893 and RBOB hit 3.0837, up .0829 on the day in reaction. 

Iraqi production levels have been stable around 3 million barrels per day, making Iraq OPECs second largest producer (behind Saudi Arabia) - so the supply concerns we're seeing push prices up at this intensity level are not unfounded. 

Essentially all of Iraq's oil production comes from the southern, Shia portion of the country by Basra, (see map from Bloomberg above)  where militant influence is essentially non existant (at least in comparison) - so some speculate that even should the Baiji refinery or additional cities fall, actual supply is unlikely to be affected as the area is well guarded and safe. However, it pays to keep in mind that no one saw Mozul or Tikrit being as vulnerable as they apparently were - the invasion of Mozul saw over 500,000 people flee the city in 12 hours, including basically the entire coalition of American-trained Iraqi security forces because of the level of violence and choas that erupted. It's less likely that would happen further south, given the relatively small insurgent force and the steeper odds they would face in terms of fighting back - but its certainly not an entirely unreasonable fear. 

The Obama administration has stated they are "considering all options" - air strikes, drones, etc but have not made a decision at this time. It would seem unlikely that an attempt to garner public support for re-entrance to Iraq would be an easy (or possible) task, all things considered. Ironically, the air strikes on Syria that  the administration faced such backlash for last year were directed at stopping the violence in the area that involved ISIS - the same group now surging in Iraq. Not a good sign for approval for Iraqi strikes. Thus far neither the UN or US has said they will step in to aid the Iraqi government - a fact that it certainly not easing concerns in the market, one would think.

In the grand scheme, considering price volatility and levels as a whole, we're fortunate that some areas (like the US) have seen production booms that have offset some of the drop offs from OPEC nations (mainly Libya) as its helped keep prices overall more stable - the jump in 2012 for example would probably have shot way past a 2% spike. If supply gets disrupted in Iraq though, given its the second largest OPEC producer, that may cease to be the case, which is probably the more far reaching concern pushing prices than isolated fighting would on its own. 

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Topics: Brent Crude, RBOB, OPEC, WTI Crude, Iraq

WTI Drops Big (Again) on Expected Builds

Posted by Kelly Burke on Apr 22, 2014 2:53:08 PM

Barrel of oil with a line chart aiming up

Last week as we discussed, the EIA reports for the prior week (ending April 11) saw inventory builds in US Crude supplies while gasoline inventories drew down. Crude Inventories actually hit their highest level since June 2013 and production hit its highest level since 1988. 

Platt's is estimating that this Wednesdays EIA report (on the week ending April 18th) will show inventory builds of  up to10 million gallons. As a result of the anticipated build, WTI has dropped more than we've seen in the previous 3 months. Brent Crude, the European benchmark, wasn't quite so lucky.

Compared to WTI's over 2% drop, Brent was down less than one percent on continued Ukrainian tensions (stop me if you've heard this one before...) and on the heels of Vice President Biden's speech this morning in Kiev, in which he expressed US support for Ukraine. The sentiment, though true, wasn't very helpful for the already fragile (read: falling apart) agreements with Russia to reduce friction in the area, especially coming one day after Secretary Kerry demanded that Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov control seperatist activity in Ukraine, with the Russians firing back that the US should intercede in to control "Ukrainian militia activity" in the region and today insisting that any agreements reached in Geneva "have nothing to do with us".  

The global headache that is Ukrainian/Russian/US relations at the moment would likely have resulted in a lot of market volatility and price spikes, but consistently increasing inventory levels have seemingly kept it at bay, particularly domestically. Hopefully that trend continues, and we start to see some progress towards resolution in Eastern Europe.

 

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Topics: EIA, Brent Crude, Brent vs WTI, Inventory report, russia, ukraine,, WTI Crude

Crude Continues to Drop on Supply Estimates & Manufacturing Speculations

Posted by Kelly Burke on Apr 1, 2014 1:44:21 PM

Crude - both Brent and WTI - continued to drop today on speculations of another inventory build on tommorows EIA report. According to a Bloomberg survey, tommorows report may show increases of 1.8mbl up to 2.5mbbl. The prior weeks report (the tenth increase in a row) indicated US Crude inventories climbed to 385 million barrels, the highest on hand since November, with PADD 3 numbers (Gulf Coast) hit over 200 million barrels, the highest since 1990. 

Additional domestic factors in the market drop is an anticipated failure of US Manufacturing increases to meet projected gains. Internationally, China is showing a drop in manufacturing index to below 50, signaling a contraction in the sector. Euro zone manufacturing is expected to show stagnant to weak numbers as well. Overall, global economic indicators are not very confidence inspiring, and in combination with increasing supply, and the impending end of the heating season in the US, we should see the market continue a downward trend, assuming EIA reports back speculative numbers. 

Last week's jobless numbers saw an unanticipated drop of 10,000 initial jobless claims. It will be interesting to see what this Friday's numbers look like - a continuing downward trend would be a positive economic sign, but time will tell what the overall impact will be. 

 

U.S. crude oil stocks graph

(Image Credit: EIA.gov)

 

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Topics: EIA, Brent Crude, Brent vs WTI, Jobless numbers, US Manufacturing Data, WTI Crude

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