Today's Takeaways from the EIA Short Term Energy Outlook

Posted by Kelly Burke on Jan 15, 2019 3:30:22 PM

MW-EK746_oil_pu_ZG_20160420135646

The US Energy Information Association - EIA - is out today with the Short Term Energy Outlook report with projections for 2019 & 2020.

Here are what I think are the major takeaways:

  • 2019 Price forecast for Crude oil - $61/bbl Brent, $53-57/bbl WTI. The Brent average for 2018 was $71/bbl, so we are expecting to continue to downward overall trend in pricing. 
  • 2019 Projected retail gas price - $2.47 (Down from 2018 average of $2.73) 
  • US Crude Production hit a high in 2018 - it is expected to continue to accelerate from the current level through 2019 & 2020. Over the next 2 years, experts expect an increase of over 1.5 million barrels per day. 
  • US Importing of crude & refined products is expected to continue to decline. Although we temporarily saw the US become a net exporter in 2018, the actual average per day imported was around 2 million barrels. That's expected to decline to 1mmb/d for 2019 and a shocking 0.1 mmb/d per day in 2020. (You read that right - .01, amazing)
  • US (Dry) Natural Gas production is expected to jump from 83 bcf per day in 2018 to 90 in 2019. 
  • Global Inventories are expected to continue to increase.  
  • On the clean energy front, coal's role in electrical production continues to decline over the next 2 years. Hydropower's share of generation is projected to remain stable. Wind power electrical generation is expected to outpace hydropower for the first time ever in 2019.
  • Carbon emissions are projected to decline 1.2% in 2019 as well, and a little under 1% for 2020 as it stands now. 

 

Long story short - expect more production, more inventory, lower prices, continued progress and growth on cleaner energy and a decline in carbon emissions - all at the same time. Happy 2019!  

 

Read More

Topics: natural gas, EIA, WTI Crude, US Crude Production, Clean Energy

Crude Poised to End 2018 Down 20%

Posted by Kelly Burke on Dec 28, 2018 1:37:29 PM

shutterstock_187711847

As we head towards the end of 2018, it looks like oil prices will finish the year out down about 20%. We saw wildly fluctuating energy markets throughout the year, but the fundamental factors of supply and global economic growth concerns kept the downward pressure on pricing over the long term. 

Let's look back at what went on this year and what we are keeping an eye on going forward.

In 2018, the United States stepped to the forefront as the world’s largest producer of Crude oil, outpacing both Russia and Saudi Arabia.

Late in the year, Saudi Arabia and Russia, along with other OPEC and OPEC partner nations, agreed to production cuts starting in 2019, but Russia had a record production month in December, so time will tell if the unofficial deal bears out.

Worth remembering, is the US has no involvement in the supply curbing that is the so-called “OPEC+” deal. Historically, we have seen the Saudi’s reluctant to cut output long term for fear of losing market share.

This becomes even more relevant today than it was two years ago, as US output increases and the US becomes a net exporter for the first time in 70 years.

Essentially, the US has gone from an esoteric threat to market share to a very real one, and there is reason to believe that this may affect how the OPEC+ agreement is adhered to (or not) through 2019.

Another factor that can affect day to day swings on the NYMEX is the performance of the stock market. As we’re all aware through this year the market was hitting all new highs, then crashing, and generally bouncing around  (the analysts are writing off this weeks one day gains as a “suckers rally” – ouch!). Stocks obviously are impacted by both the at-large economy and the ramifications of political actions and their accompanying sentiments.

To put it politely, the US political arena right now is very... let's call it “exciting”, so it would probably be wise to anticipate an ongoing roller coaster with stocks – what we don’t know is how that could carry over on energy pricing in the long term.

The other ball in the air is the current Government shut down – prior shut downs were less than devastating in terms of any significant or lasting price impacts on energy – however, we wont know if that is the case with this one until it’s over. Right now there is know way of knowing how long the shutdown will last, obviously the longer it goes on, the more impact it has on federal employees, programs, and citizens. When it will end is anyone’s guess.

Lots to keep an eye on as we round into 2019. Have an awesome holiday, hope to see you all in the New Year!

Read More

Topics: Market analysis, OPEC, US Crude Production

Markets Reverse on Strong Demand Signals

Posted by Kelly Burke on Dec 19, 2018 2:02:07 PM

markets_pic

Markets reversed in a big way today, with front month WTI Crude surging 3% after yesterdays 7.3% decline. At time of writing, both diesel and gas are up (ULSD +.0447, RBOB +.0307)

According to the experts, today's reversal is largely based on demand level optimism on refined products. The DOE indicated that distillate inventories dropped by 4.2 million barrels, a sharp contrast to the half a million barrel build analysts had predicted. Diesel demand is at levels not seen since early 2003.

Despite today's jump it's important to remember that prices are still very low overall - both Crudes (Brent & WTI) are down over 30% since the end of September. The strong indicators for refined product demand also don't do much to address the larger issue weighing on prices, namely, global supply levels and overall global economic concerns as they relate to demand. 

The OPEC+ deal wont be in effect until the beginning of 2019, and current production levels are high. Saudi Arabia is anticipating lower global supply levels by the end of March, but their statement on the matter hasn't done much to slow the overall trend of plummeting prices. 

 Economically, the US is doing well but there are concerns that the Fed's response to strong economic growth - raising interest rates yet again may put a damper on growth pace going forward. This concern may or not be borne out, however, as recent rate increases have seemingly been absorbed without catastrophe. It may very well have short term impacts on both the NYMEX and financial markets, however.

The Fed is expected to make a rate hike announcement this afternoon, we will have to wait and see what those impacts are, and how much staying power they have.  

Stay tuned. 

 

Read More

Topics: DOE, Market analysis, WTI Crude

NYMEX Plummets on Renewed Fears of Supply Glut

Posted by Kelly Burke on Dec 18, 2018 1:24:49 PM

markets_pic

Futures are crashing on the NYMEX today, with WTI down around 5% thus far on the day, around the $48/bbl mark, on track to potentially close out at a 15 month low. Refined products are tanking as well, at time of writing, ULSD is off .0472 & RBOB is down .0341

So what's going on?

Once again, it appears the sell off is based on concerns of global oversupply, with the headline being that Russia is reportedly increasing output. The hike could put them at close to 11.5 million barrels per day, according to MarketWatch. 

You may recall that earlier this month prices spiked on the announcement that Russia & OPEC nations were agreeing to cut production by a combined 1.2 million barrels (here's a refresher: OPEC+ Agreement Spikes NYMEX)

Apparently, Russia has changed its mind. 

Along with the news about Russian production (unconfirmed news, for the record) the US has reportedly been upping shale production by more than what analysts had predicted, and globally, it looks like China is potentially poised for a slow down in demand growth, which is also weighing on prices. 

The EIA inventory reports due out later this week may impact whether the decline backs off or continues. Platts is predicting inventory draws on Crude & Distillates, so if they are wrong, we can expect some more downward movement on the EIA release.... theoretically anyways.  

Stay tuned!

Read More

Topics: Market analysis, NYMEX, russia

OPEC+ Production Agreement Spikes NYMEX

Posted by Kelly Burke on Dec 7, 2018 12:22:50 PM

markets_pic

OPEC, as well as the so called "OPEC+" partners have reached a tentative agreement on production cuts, causing the oil market to spike Friday. The cuts reportedly amount to 800,000 bpd on OPEC's part, and an additional 400,000 bpd (combined) from allied nations, including Russia. No specific cuts by country were committed to, or at least they were not confirmed in statements. 

The agreement reached purportedly contains "special considerations" for Venezuela, Libya and Iran. These 3 nations have been up and down in terms of supply levels as a result of domestic turmoil, and their revenue concerns obviously differ from those of nations like Saudi Arabia, so concessions for their agreement presumably needed to be made to get the deal done. No word yet on precisely what those concessions are.  

This morning the market was up 5% on Brent Crude, and 4% on WTI shortly after the open. At time of writing,(noon) both RBOB and Diesel are up almost 7 cents. 

What's interesting about the spike today is that the tentatively agreed to cuts are right in line with what analysts expected to see (estimates were 1-1.5mmb, and the agreement came in at 1.2), which should have meant it was already "priced in" but Wednesday & Thursdays' markets don't bear out that assumption. 

Time will tell if this particular OPEC related jump is temporary & speculative, as they often are, or if the production cut agreement will have its intended goal of propping crude at desired benchmarks and holding up the increases going forward. 

Stay Tuned! 

 

Read More

Topics: OPEC

Dow Collapse Pushes Prices Down Despite Storm & Supply Concerns

Posted by Kelly Burke on Oct 11, 2018 12:55:41 PM

markets_pic

Despite earlier in the week price increases on global supply concerns (Iran), and Hurricane Michael making landfall in the Florida Pan handle in the afternoon, Wednesday saw oil prices slump 2% on intraday trading.

Despite the fact that both of those variables usually push prices up, the catastrophic day for the US markets Wednesday overall pulled energy prices down with the ship, so to speak. The Dow Jones was down over 800 points yesterday, seemingly for no clear reason. (Currently, as of writing, the Dow is down slightly today, while the Nasdaq is up slightly).

Hurricane Michael is currently tracking through the Carolina's on its way back out to sea and has been downgraded to a tropical storm, which minimizes further supply interruption concerns. 

The energy markets today are again trending downward, as of 12:30 diesel was down over 4 and gas was down over 6. 

The EIA report this morning showed builds on Crude higher than analysts expected, with inventories up 5.98 million barrels. (projections were a 2 million barrel build). Both gasoline and distillates showed builds as well (951K barrels and 42K barrels, respectively) when projections showed both would be draws.

Presumably that looks good for continuing downward price pressure on refined products, but you never know. 

At the close yesterday, ULSD settled at 2.3949 (-.0289), RBOB at 2.0204 (-.0570) and Crude closed at $73.17. Today, as mentioned, we are trending down as well so we look to hold steady below the $2 & $75 benchmarks for the week.

(as an aside, the exchange platform is a great way to capture market drops like the ones we saw today and yesterday, if you would like more information on how to utilize that buying option, reach out to your rep or contact us via the site)

Stay Tuned!

 

 

Read More

Topics: EIA Inventories

Projected Draws & Hurricane Fears Push Prices Higher

Posted by Kelly Burke on Sep 12, 2018 11:25:29 AM

The Carolina's are bracing for a potentially "once in a lifetime" strength Hurricane and evacuations are already underway. Hurricane Florence is expected to make landfall Friday at a category 4, with the preceding rain & storm surge expected to begin early Thursday. 

This is the current projected map (courtesy of googlemaps), although the storm may shift substantially any time prior to landfall. You can track live on CNN.com. 

image

On the markets side, there are obviously concerns about supply disruptions. At the moment pipelines are running but there are anticipated planned outages in affected areas over the next several days. 

Tuesday saw refined products jump across the board, including an over 5 cent leap on RBOB.

At Tuesdays close we were $2.2520 (+0342) on ULSD, $2.0142 (+.0550) RBOB, and $69.25 Crude. 

This morning we are seeing modest gains thus far. The API is projecting draws, but we will have to wait and see if the EIA data backs that up.

Obviously, changes in hurricane direction and severity will have impacts, we will update you on relevant changes as we get them.

Stay safe out there!

 

 

Read More

Topics: API, EIA Inventories, hurricane florence

OPEC Concerns Trump EIA Numbers to Drop Crude Prices

Posted by Kelly Burke on Nov 29, 2017 3:32:04 PM

markets_pic.jpg

Oil was down today as the market weighed out OPEC speculation on one hand, and a drop in US Crude inventories on the other.

OPEC concerns seem to have won the day, given the drop in the face of an EIA report indicating a 3.4mmb drop (projections were 2.3mmb drop), some of which is presumably attributable to the Keystone pipeline leak & subsequent supply diversions.

Refined products showed builds of 2.7mmb on distillates, 3.6 mmb on gas. (projections were 230K and 1.3mmb, respectively).

OPEC is set to meet tommorow (Thursday) in Vienna to discuss extending production cuts through the end of 2018. 

The current deal keeps 1.8mmb/day off the global markets via production cuts, and is set to expire in March but a new agreement would extend it through December. The running assumption was that it would be a no brainer to extend, but surprise, surprise, a few days out from the meeting and Russia had not yet agreed on anything. Thoughts are they may argue for a shorter agreement or push for renegotiation closer to the March expiration.

What does this all mean?

The assumption in the market currently has been that the OPEC deal extension is essentially "priced in" already. What that means is that failing a 9 month extension, we could see the recent gains evaporate rather quickly and see crude prices dip, with WTI falling back at or below the $50 benchmark, or even lower than that if there is no deal at all. 

From OPEC/Russia's side of the aisle, an agreement on production cut extension to bolster pricing may be met with continued increase in US domestic production, which could both offset gains and damage their market share in the long view. That position is somewhat supported by rebounding US production levels & refinery utilization rates. 

Last week we saw WTI close out at a high of $58.02, but it has receeded over the past few sessions, closing today out at $57.30. ULSD & RBOB tumbled today as well, with ULSD dropping .0286 to 1.9221 and RBOB dropping .0411 to 1.7309. 

Stay tuned!

 

 

Read More

Topics: CRUDE, OPEC, NYMEX, EIA Inventories

EIA Long Term Projections Dampen Inventory Effects

Posted by Kelly Burke on Oct 12, 2017 2:57:45 PM

markets_pic.jpg

 

WTI was in the red today ahead of the EIA inventory report.

API projections were that Crude would show builds of 3.1mmb - of note on this is API was an outlier of sorts, Platts forecasted draws of 400K barrels ahead of the official reporting.

Internationally, IEA Forecasts for global oil demand growth remained at 1.6m bpd, so flat demand growth amid the continued oversupply that doesnt seem to have much of an end in sight, long term picture wise. 

Anyhow, the official EIA report showed a draw down in Crude of 2.8mmb for the week ending 10/6. Gasoline was up 2.5mmb and distillates were down 1.5mmb. Gasoline had been projected to be down 1.4mmb, so the drop off we saw on gasoline today makes sense given the actuals. 

Side note - the EIA Report showed builds in Nat Gas of 87 billion cubic feet, right in line with Platts projections. The market was essentially unchanged on the builds, presumably because it makes sense there would be a temporary bump in inventories given temperatures havent dropped off, so demand should be low.Usually in New England we are well into the battle to keep the heat off til November 1 by now - this year not so much. I still have my air conditioner in the window.  

Gulf Refineries are back online and at capacity after temporary shut downs for Hurricane Nate, which probably is a factor in pushing pricing down as well in the face of flat demand.

In addition to the U.S. being back fully functional, EIA forecasts put U.S. domestic crude production at 9.9mmb per day for 2018 which would be the highest on average in U.S. history. Continued domestic production is seen as being a factor that will offset moves by OPEC or other nations to push a pricing rally. Theoretically, a rally cannot be sustained long term globally if the U.S. keeps production levels rising. We'll have to wait and see on that. 

The official numbers we closed out at this afternoon were: ULSD 1.7655 (-.0206), Gas 1.5832 (-.0260) and Crude landed right around the benchmark at $50.60

Thats all for today!

 

 

Read More

Topics: natural gas, EIA, EIA Inventories, $50 benchmark

EIA Draws Keep NYMEX Boosted; Venezuelan Vote & Sanctions Loom on the Horizon

Posted by Kelly Burke on Jul 26, 2017 3:26:56 PM

markets_pic.jpg

Today, the NYMEX continued it's winning streak - At the end of the day, we settled up across the board yet again, with Crude settling out at $48.75/bbl (+1.7%), ULSD climbed +.0268 to $1.5953 and RBOB edged up +.02111 to $1.6173. 

Yesterday we talked about the OPEC production & export factors affecting the market, as well as projected slow downs in domestic oil & gas exploration. (For a refresher, you can peruse yesterdays article here: 2017s Largest One Day Rally Hits on OPEC & US Production Projections ) 

Today, while API projections called for a 10.23mmb draw in Crude, the EIA Inventory Report showed an actual draw of 7.2mmb. Current Crude levels are now around 483.4 mmb, or the upper end of average for this time of year. For finished products, distillates drew down 1.9mmb but are still on the upper end of what we normally see for average levels, while on gasoline, projections were calling for a build of 1.9mmb but actuals showed a draw of 1mmb. 

In broader news that can potentially have huge ("YUGE!") market impacts, the Trump administration has floated the possibility of a ban on Venezuelan Crude as a U.S. response to Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, should he choose to go forward with rewriting the country's constitution, in what the United States sees as a move to clamp down on opposition. The vote on rewriting the country's constitution is expected Sunday, and Platts is reporting that the U.S. Treasury department is crafting sanctions currently. 

At the same time however, even as the Treasury works out the details, it appears the Administration has already backed off of the idea after looking at its potential impacts. They are now hinting at more targeted sanctions than an overall ban, but that would still likely create some serious aftershocks in the market.

Venezuela is the third largest supplier of imported Crude oil to the United States (after Canada and Saudi Arabia), and supplies a huge percentage of the Crude refined in the Gulf Coast.

A ban could be devastating for US refiners and importers, and even simply not taking the option off the table could impact the markets in a drastic way over the next few days, particularly if the option remains even theoretically possible on Monday after the vote takes place (its expected to be a "show vote" with Maduro's desired outcome essentially 100% certain).

Definitely something to keep an eye on that could drastically change the supply and pricing picture as we know it.

Stay tuned!  

Read More

Topics: CRUDE, EIA Inventories, sanctions, Venezuela

Recent Posts

Posts by Topic

see all